Google Adds Cancun, Isla Mujeres To Underwater Street View

Google Adds Cancun, Isla Mujeres To Underwater Street View

Google Adds Cancun, Isla Mujeres To Underwater Street View

Cancun, Isla Mujeres now in Google Underwater Street View

Can’t snorkel but still would like to see the fabulous underwater marine life off the coast of Riveiera Maya? Google has found a solution for you. Google has added two new underwater destinations in Mexico to its Google underwater Street View scenes.

According to Techcrunch, Google is collaborating with the Catlin Seaview Project to capture the imminent danger to the coral reefs around the world using high-definition underwater photography. The new undersea images from around Isla Mujeres and Cancun in Mexico reveal a whale shark swimming near Isla Contoy and a sunken car teeming with life which is one of the item of the famous underwater museum at Isla Mujeres.

The underwater Street View was first started in 2012. Now Google has added many locations like reefs around Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the Philippines, Hawaii, locations off the coast of Bermuda and Galapagos Islands.

The divers typically cover about 2 kilometers and take between 3,000 and 4,000 images per dive during their expeditions and the team goes about three dives per day, each of which lasting for about an hour.

The latest addition to Street View is the shoreline of San Francisco as seen from the water, the report added.

Cancun Underwater Museum Adds Visitor Center

Cancun Underwater Museum Adds Visitor Center

Cancun Underwater Museum Adds Visitor Center

Cancun underwater museum is a wonder in itself which attracts 87,000 of tourists every year. It has become a landmark and a must-see museum in Cancun. In an effort to make the underwater museum even more attractive and to draw visitors who cannot dive, a visitor center has been added. The visitor center showcases the replicas of the underwater museum’s most popular sculptures.

The underwater museum started in 2009, is one of its kind in the world. Divers and snorkelers can see the underwater world of 500 statues. Recently 11 new sculptures were added by the artist Jason deCaires Taylor. The museum is also called the “Silent Evolution” gallery. The museum is actually an effort to conserve the natural coral reefs as the statues act as abode for the aquatic wildlife. The results are visible as many statues are barely visible.

The new artworks are made of revolutionary form of stainless steel framework and rely on live planted corals to form the narrative and structure of the works.

This museum has enhanced the Cancun real estate’s standing in the art and culture world. Cancun which has for long been associated with beaches and spring-breakers is now increasingly becoming a hub of art and culture ( check Beaches, Yoga, Art, Food, Polo – Cancun’s Got It All).